Hotels in Cumbria and The Lake District

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Hotels in Cumbria and The Lake District

Cumbria and the Lake District – England’s Garden Playground

Without a doubt, the Lake District is the premiere recreational district in all of England. Travellers from far and wide travel to the district year-round to experience the great outdoors, climb mountains and muck around on boats. Some even seek the sort of inspiration the lakes and peaks provided to great poets. But it’s not all fun and games, with more serious business being conducted in the county capital of Carlisle and the contentious Sellafield Nuclear Processing Plant being situated on the coast.

Lake Windermere and the Abundance of Lakes

The abundance of lakes in the area have attracted people to the Lake District since as far back as there are records - from Viking Raiders of the 10th century to speed freaks of the early 20th century looking to break water speed records. Today, the area is better known for attracting those looking for a tranquil break in the countryside, with perhaps a bit of activity out on one of the lakes. Windermere is the best known of the lakes, with the town on its eastern shore offering hotels, B&B’s and all the amenities modern day travellers need. Lake access can be obtained at Bowness Bay, which has a number of boat clubs where visitors can go on organised day cruises or rent kayaks, speedboats and other craft to operate themselves. Coniston Water, Derwent Water and Ullswater are three of the better-known lakes. They are less developed than Windermere and offer a bit more tranquillity. There a few lakes without any car access, so those really looking to get away from it all, and who are prepared for a bit of a trek, can head to places like Devoke Water for some peace and quiet.

From Lazy Ambles to Mountain Ascents

The Lake District is perhaps best-loved by ramblers, who have enjoyed communing with nature and getting a spot of exercise at the same time since at least the start of the industrial age. Today, city dwellers flock to the area to hike on one of its many trails. Many are flat and do not require too much exertion, but serious hikers and climbers will relish the opportunity to scale one of its many 900m+ peaks. Scafell Pike, as the highest mountain in England, is one of the more popular climbs. There are a number of routes up, with novices advised to choose the route from Wasdale, due to its relative ease and popularity. Winter sees regular snowfalls in the area, so climbers at this time are advised to be well-prepared for icy weather. In the last couple of decades, mountain biking has exploded in popularity, with a number of routes, both gentle and extreme, throughout the region. Many mountain bikers end up touring the whole area by bike, staying overnight at the hotels or B&B’s along their route.

Artistic Routes and Meanders

The exceptional beauty of the Lake District has long attracted artists and creative people in general. It is best known as being a natural inspiration of one of England’s most revered romantic poet’s, William Wordsworth. His admirers typically make a pilgrimage to the lovely Dove Cottage, where he lived in rural tranquillity and penned some of his best-known poems, such as Imitations of Immortality. It is on the edge of Grasmere, so close to the town’s hotels and B&B’s. Some also visit Wordsworth House in Cockermouth, where the poet was born. It serves as a writer’s house museum. The other writer most associated with the Lake District is Beatrix Potter, creator of endearing children’s books such as The Tale of Peter Rabbit. The World of Beatrix Potter is a popular theme park in Bowness-on-Windermere and has a great deal to entertain fans of Potter’s work, young and old alike. At present, the Lake District is popular with artists and craftspeople, many of whom show and sell their work in galleries and markets in the larger villages.

Serving the Needs of the County

Lovely as it is, Cumbria is a bit more than just the Lake District. Work must be done, and the community served. No city in Cumbria is in a better position to do this than Carlisle. Serving as the county seat, and its only official city, Carlisle has the size and population necessary to be able to offer the practical amenities that both leisure and business travellers require. These include a mainline station, a university and cultural, commercial and industrial facilities. The town was established by the Romans to service Hadrian’s Wall and has preserved much of its heritage over the years. It is known for its especially well preserved castle, which has seen many English-Scottish battles over its 900-year history. It is open to the public (fee) and includes a museum that will be a hit among military history fans. Its city centre is mostly pedestrianised and houses most of the city’s best hotels and shopping.

Price range

from ‎RM167to ‎RM3,469

Top hotels

    Hotel Ees Wyke Country House Near Sawrey

    The family-owned Ees Wyke Country House stands within Near Sawrey, offering idyllic country views overlooking Esthwaite Water, historic architecture, classic accommodations and numerous AA rosette dining awards. The Good Hotel guide has mentioned them more than once.Numerous walkways can be accessed easily from the guest house, stretching throughout the greenery of the vast countryside. There are eight spacious rooms at the guest house, each offering standard amenities and cozy classic furnishings. Ees Wyke Country House features free Wi-Fi and free self-parking. Each morning the guesthouse serves a full English breakfast featuring home-baked breads and pastries as well as locally source produce and Cumberland sausage. The regal guesthouse is 2-miles from the Windermere Ferry. The lodging is 0.2 miles from Hill Top and 3-miles from the Church of St. Mary. The Beatrix Potter Gallery is 2.1-miles away. more

    Hotel Belle Green Near Sawrey

    Belle Green has recently been refurbished to offer three en-suite guest rooms with views overlooking the village of Near Sawrey, where Beatrix Potter wrote her famous children's books. In fact she stayed at Belle Green shortly after she bought her farm, Hill Top, during 1905 and 1906. It is the ideal place to explore the Lake District national park, which has now been awarded UNESCO World Heritage Status. We have two rooms with king size beds and one twin room, all with en-suite bathrooms. For best prices and seasonal offers please contact us directly by phone or email. more